EDUCATIONAL TOOLS FOR TEACHING KIDS 4+ ABOUT BLACK HISTORY

EDUCATIONAL TOOLS FOR TEACHING KIDS 4+ ABOUT BLACK HISTORY

How do you find the right balance for your child/children when you and your spouse come from two or more distinctly different cultures?  Is there a point where you are teaching them more about one culture than the other?  Our biracial (African-American and South Asian) daughter recently turned 4.  And since her birth we have been focused on sharing both of our cultures with her by: traveling to see family in the U.S. and India, making and eating family cuisines, reading books, going to museums, watching movies, learning and dancing to music, and heading to cultural events etc.

THE CULTURAL LEARNING BALANCING ACT

As a result, we have shared with you all a plethora of South Asian learning tools that we have discovered and love.  And, to digress a bit, what has been phenomenal is that many South Asian companies have reached out to us. Because they recognize multiracial and multicultural families need educational resources like those they provide for their kids too. Outright applaudable, right?!  Thus, today we are going to share some learning tools oriented towards teaching younger kids, ages 4+ more about Black History.

BLACK HISTORY RESOURCES

We have treaded lightly on talking with our daughter about slavery because our daughter is extremely color conscious and she has been this way for sometime.  It is to the point that the first thing she says to someone she meets is that I’m brown, and you are X, or are you X?  And no, the next thing we don’t want her to add in the course of a conversation is, and you did X to my mommy, or my mommy’s people.

Toddlers are extraordinarily unfiltered!  And, yes, we are working on showing her how to hold a conversation without it being based on color because it shouldn’t be.  For all the parents and parents to be reading this, all I can say is, “oh, the joys, of parenting!”

BLACK HISTORY TEACHING TOOLS FOR YOUNG KIDS AGES 4+

The ABC Me Flashcards

Ages 4+

We love these flash cards for kids! These flash cards reinforce our daughter’s mastery of the ABCs and they provide her with knowledge of Black historical figures and facts.

 

The Story of Ruby Bridges

Author: Robert Coles

Ages: 4-8

Grades: Preschool-3

Pages: 32

We started with this book and talk about what Ruby Bridges did. This book focuses on the desegregation of schools in the U.S.

 

Henry’s Freedom Box: A True Story From The Underground Railroad

Author: Ellen Levine

Ages: 4-8

Grades: Preschool-3

Pages: 40


This is the book that we are going to use to begin a discussion with our daughter about the underground railroad.  ***”This book does start off by stating Henry was a slave.” Our 4 year old does not understand what that means nor could she rationalize it.  Hence we have decided to wait until she is 5 to take a greater dive into it.

 

Child of the Civil Rights Movement

Author:  Paula Young Shelton

Ages: 4-8

Grades: Preschool-3

Pages: 48

This book is an introductory discussion for kids to the civil rights movement of the 50s-60s.

 

I am Rosa Parks

Author: Brad Meltzer

Ages: 5-8

Grades: K-3

Pages: 40

This book creates a great dialog about race relations.  It is the story of Rosa Parks.  Rosa Parks dared to stand up for herself and other African-Americans by staying seated on a public bus.  Hence, she helped end public bus segregation and is a recognized hero in the Civil Rights Movement.

 

I am Martin Luther King

Author: Brad Meltzer

Ages:  5-8

Grades: K-3

Pages: 40

This is a cute and simple book that provides kids with a great summary on who Martin Luther King, Jr was and the civil rights movement.

 

The Youngest Marcher: The Story of Audrey Faye Hendricks, A Young Civil Rights Activist

Author: Cynthia Levinson

Ages: 5-10

Grades: K-5

Pages: 40

This book portrays the civil rights movement through the eyes of a child.  Meet Audrey Faye Hendricks the youngest child to be arrested during a civil rights protest in Birmingham, Alabama.

 

What Black history resources have you and your family enjoyed?  Feel free to share this post and comment below!  Have a question for us? Write us at growingupgupta@gmail.com

This post contains affiliate links which support the operation of this blog.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *